Make us your home page
Instagram

Jeremy Wallace, Times/Herald Tallahassee Bureau

Jeremy Wallace

Jeremy Wallace covers state government and politics in Tallahassee for the Tampa Bay Times. Prior to joining the Times in 2015, he spent 15 years covering state and local politics in Florida, most recently for the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. He previously covered Washington, D.C., for the Boston Globe and the Detroit Free-Press. He grew up in San Antonio, Texas, and holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Missouri. He and his wife have three children.

Phone: (850) 224-7263

Email: jwallace@tampabay.com

Twitter: @JeremySWallace

link
  1. As state budget talks wind down, which local projects are making the cut?

    News

    TALLAHASSEE —With the big ticket items in the state budget resolved or in the hands of the top leaders in the House and Senate, the rest of the Florida Legislature hunkered down into marathon negotiations over the weekend to dole out hundreds of millions of dollars for local projects back home.

    While many of the items are tiny in a budget of $83 billion, they are the library projects, museums, park renovations and roadway work legislators crave to bring back home to win praise from voters....

    With time running out to negotiate next year's proposed $83 billion budget, the Florida Senate has included $1 millions for the 

Clearwater Marine Aquarium. But the Florida House hasn't included any money for the aquarium so far. [DOUG CLIFFORD | Tampa Bay Times]
  2. Legislature drills down on hundreds of millions of dollars for local projects

    Blog

    With the big ticket items in the state budget resolved or in the hands of the top leaders in the House and Senate, the rest of the Florida Legislature hunkered down into marathon negotiations over the weekend to dole or hundreds of millions of dollars for local projects back home.

    While many of the items are tiny in a budget of $83 billion, they are the library projects, museums, park renovations and roadway work legislators crave to bring back home to win praise from voters....

  3. Did House Speaker retaliate against members who supported Visit Florida funding? Jack Latvala says yes

    Blog

    State Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, said he's convinced most rank-and-file members in the House never wanted to see Visit Florida slashed so dramatically.

    But Latvala told reporters on Friday that House members were forced by "one guy" to vote with him or face political retaliation. Latvala didn't mention House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, by name, but it was clear who he was referencing....

    Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater
  4. Cuts get more severe for Rick Scott's top priority

    Blog

    The cuts to Gov. Rick Scott's primary job creation agency is even deeper than first thought.

    The Florida Legislature rolled out new budget details Friday that would not only reject the Governor's request for $85 million for job incentives to lure businesses to Florida, but also cut the agency that promotes Florida as a business destination and organizes international job training missions like the one Scott was on earlier this week in Argentina....

    Gov. Rick Scott
  5. Gaming debate continues for Day 3 in Florida Legislature

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Florida lawmakers continued to move forward on gambling legislation Thursday, debating whether to renew a compact with the Seminole Tribe, which could produce as much as $300 million in annual revenue, or to expand slot machines and other gaming operations elsewhere.

    House gambling negotiators broke a years-long impasse Wednesday and agreed to open the door for competitive bids for a slots casino based in Miami-Dade County, rejecting a Senate plan that would have allowed two casinos, one each in Miami-Dade and Broward. But the Senate countered Thursday, proposing two casinos again but making concessions to the Seminole Tribe....

  6. Gov. Rick Scott faces jarring rebuke in legislative budget deal

    Blog

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott traveled the state the last two months calling out legislators for opposing his top budget priorities.

    He spent more than $1.2 million on ads trying to win the public over to his thinking.

    And on Thursday he was even seen making rare house calls to Senators and House members in their offices to persuade them.

    It all failed.

    When the House and Senate announced they reached the framework of a budget deal it, they all but rejected Scott's top three demands. There was no new funding for the state's job incentive program. Tourism marketing was slashed by $50 million. And there was no money for speeding up of repair work on the dike around Lake Okeechobee. Scott sought $200 million....

  7. Legislature pushes to rename roadway after slain Tarpon Springs officer

    Blog

    The state of Florida is set to rename a stretch of Alternate U.S. 19 in Pinellas County in honor of a Tarpon Springs police officer killed in the line of duty in late 2014.

    The Florida Senate unanimously voted Thursday to rename a stretch of the roadway from Tarpon Avenue to the Pasco County line the Officer Charles ‘Charlie K’ Kondek Jr. Memorial Highway. The House passed an identical bill on Wednesday....

  8. Gov. Rick Scott faces jarring rebuke in legislative budget deal

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott traveled the state the last two months calling out legislators for opposing his top budget priorities.

    He spent more than $1.2 million on ads trying to win the public over to his thinking.

    And on Thursday he was even seen making rare house calls to Senators and House members in their offices to persuade them.

    It all failed.

    When the House and Senate announced they reached the framework of a budget deal, they all but rejected Scott's top three demands. There was no new funding for the state's job incentive program. Tourism marketing was slashed by $50 million. And there was no money for speeding up repair work on the dike around Lake Okeechobee. Scott sought $200 million....

    Florida Governor Rick Scott speaks to reporters after a roundtable discussion with Tampa community leaders and business owners about the state of Enterprise Florida and its relation to Florida's military and defense communities in March in Tampa. [Andres Leiva | Tampa Bay Times]
  9. Seminole Hard Rock Casino can add craps and roulette under new state plan

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — After years of gridlock over the state's gambling laws, the Florida House agreed to major concessions Wednesday that include allowing Tampa's Seminole Hard Rock Casino to offer craps and roulette for the first time and a financial boost to Tampa Bay Downs.

    The deal, if approved by lawmakers, would greatly expand the Hard Rock — already one of the world's largest casinos. The Interstate 4 complex in 2012 underwent a $75 million expansion of its casino floor that's now the size of five football fields....

    Tampa Bay Downs. [Times (2013)]
  10. Does Legislature budget deal dare a Rick Scott veto?

    Blog

    Despite nearly daily warnings from Gov. Rick Scott that the Legislature is on the brink of damaging the state economy, the House and Senate appeared ready to move forward with an $83 billion budget deal that would severely cut his two biggest priorities, Visit Florida and Enterprise Florida.

    “We have reached an agreement on allocations,” Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, told senators during the Senate’s morning session....

    Corcoran and Negron
  11. More warnings from Rick Scott's office against cutting Visit Florida

    Blog

    As the Florida Legislature steams towards a budget deal that increasingly looks like it would gut funding for Visit Florida, Gov. Rick Scott's office put out a letter warning of dire fiscal consequences if lawmakers don't change course.

    The Florida House and Senate appeared to be nearing a budget deal that would cut Visit Florida's $76 million budget to just $25 million next year. Scott had called for $100 million for the agency to market the state....

  12. Ex-Miami Rep didn't file tax returns for 9 years

    Blog

    From Patricia Mazzei and Jay Weaver of the Miami Herald:

    For eight years, Erik Fresen served in the Florida House of Representatives, leaving office last November due to term limits.

    During all eight of those years, Fresen never filed a federal income tax return.

    Fresen, a Miami Republican, pleaded guilty in federal court Wednesday to failing to file a tax return for 2011, a year in which he received $270,136 in income he didn’t report to Uncle Sam....

  13. Jeff Atwater still not certain on departure date

    Blog

    Florida's Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater is still not certain when he will leave his current position and take a post with Florida Atlantic University.

    Atwater, a Republican from Palm Beach County, told The Buzz today that he may still be in office when the Cabinet next meets on May 27.

    In February, Atwater announced he was taking a position at FAU, but only after the Legislature finishes it's annual session on May 5. There was no specific date he intended to leave. Gov. Rick Scott and the other two members of the Florida Cabinet had treated the last Cabinet meeting on April 11 as Atwater's last meeting. They gave him going away gifts and saluted his tenure in office....

  14. Apology for Dozier victims clears Legislature

    Blog

    The children killed and tortured at the hands of the state at a reform school in north Florida have a formal apology from both chambers of the Florida Legislature.

    The Florida Senate voted this morning on a formal apology to the thousands of men who spent years of their childhood at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys. In the bill by Sen. Darryl Rouson, the Senate acknowledged the abuse that for decades had been denied by the state at Dozier and another reform school just north of Lake Okeechobee....

  15. Injured on the job? It might get harder in Florida to find a lawyer to take your case

    Legislature

    Florida is already one of the hardest states for workers seeking treatment or lost wages when injured on the job.

    Now lawmakers are trying again to make it more difficult for employees to sue when they have wrongly been denied workers' compensation. Competing House and Senate bills would impose new caps on workers' attorney fees in such disputes, which critics say will discourage lawyers from taking cases....

    Workers laying concrete blocks for a new home under construction in southern Hillsborough County. Those injured on the job could find it harder to seek court action when they feel they have been wrongly denied care or compensation by their employer's insurer, under bills that could cap attorneys fees in such cases.  [SKIP O'ROURKE | Times (2012)]